IT WAS WRITTEN BETTER THAN ILLMATIC?

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IT WAS WRITTEN BETTER THAN ILLMATIC?

     Illmatic birthed the legend. But it was It Was Written birthed the star. After Nas dropped arguably the greatest debut in hip-hop history, the big question was what would he do next.  As official as Illmatic was, another New York native from Brooklyn also dropped a classic debut the same year that would later become the East Coast blueprint for platinum success. Illmatic was a timeless classic, but loomed in the shadows of the towering impact that would be Biggie Smalls' Ready To Die album. Nas originally intended for his second album to be entirely produced by the Queensbridge legend, Marley Marl. Once those plans fell through, he ended up linking up with the Trackmasters. They would be Nas' Puffy & the Hitmen, providing Nas with polished, mainstream instrumentals for him to unleash his poetic lyrics upon. In doing so, Nas transitioned from raw lyricist to polished artist. It Was Written was definitely not critically received as well by the masses as Illmatic, but I'm here to lay the case for why It Was Written was just as important, if not more, as Illmatic.(as sacrilegious as that might sound).

     Illmatic gave us a young, hungry Nas. A Nas that had so much to say the vocabulary effortlessly spilled onto every grimy New York beat supplied by possibly the greatest ensemble of producers on a hip-hop album. As crazy as that album was lyrically, it failed to connect with people who were not hardcore hip-hop fans. Nas had to take note at the success of Biggie, who had a more straightforward approach to lyricism. It Was Written saw Nas spit with a more refined technique and cadence.  Nas seemed to have a razor-like focus in coming for the crown that had been bestowed upon Biggie with his debut. The lyricism was prevalent throughout the LP but more controlled and with more style. The flow was more sharpened, more precise. Song structure took more precedence where Illmatic was more organic and broke rules. As a result, it made Nas' complex lyricism more accessible. It Was Written proved Nas was just as formidable as a music artist as he was a lyricist.

     While Illmatic's sound was infused in the traditional boom bap East coast sound, It Was Written's production took a more universal approach. Due in large part to The Trackmasters, It Was Written featured Nas rapping over the type of commercial instrumentals that would garner more radio spins and allow him to get his voice out to a more diverse audience. It Was Written showcased a more balanced sound that blended the hard, grimy New York sound beautifully with radio friendly, dare I say, R&B-ish type melodies. In that sense, Ready To Die was a direct influence. But Nas took more risks incorporating a West Coast influence with "Nas is Coming" and "Street Dreams" (using the same sample as 2pac's "All Eyez On Me"). In fact, Nas was the first East Coast artist to work with Dr. Dre, a slept on fact of It Was Written. Production from Havoc, DJ Premier, L.E.S., and Live Squad still fed the New York streets with the introspective, Donald Goines, poignant lyricism that you came to expect from Nas. This is how It Was Written succeeded where Illmatic failed, which is producing a hit record. Nas was able to elevate from underground phenomenon to MTV/radio star with "If I Ruled The World" and "Street Dreams" (as well as the remix with R.Kelly). Illmatic made an attempt to get radio spins with "It Ain't Hard To Tell", which unfortunately came out the same time as SWV's single, "Right Here", using the same Michael Jackson "Human Nature" sample.

     Nas would later brag about how his first album had no famous guest appearances. However, It Was Written featured a slew of guests that all brought their A game to enhance what I consider to be Nas' second classic. It Was Written was the album that continued to establish his alliance with Mobb Deep (which featured a Prodigy verse originally intended for CNN's "LA, LA" response to The Dogg Pound). Havoc supplied the grimy beats to "The Set Up" and "Live Nigga Rap", which both sounded like they could have fit perfectly on their Hell On Earth album. A young Mobb Deep dragging us through the harsh terrains of the Queensbridge projects with their brand of "tough guy" rap and dun language. Let us not forget, this was when Prodigy was in his prime and arguably a top 5 rapper. It Was Written also introduced us to The Firm. And while the Firm did not pan out to be the rap supergroup we thought they would, "Affirmative Action" turned out to be a classic collaboration. AZ, Cormega, and up and comer, Foxy Brown, laced a competitive posse cut that still has folks arguing who had the best verse in 2015. And then, there was Lauryn Hill who lended her beautiful vocals over Nas' biggest hit record, "If I Ruled The World". Nas proved he could hold his own with the cream of the crop the 90's had to offer.

     The mafioso/coke rap subgenre was the trend in the mid 90's and provided us with countless classics. You had AZ's Doe or Die, Raekwon's Only Built For Cuban Linx, Junior Mafia's Conspiracy, Jay-Z's Reasonable Doubt, Kool G. Rap's 4,5,6, etc. All had roots in a style that took off with Biggie's Ready To Die. It Was Written turned out to be one of the most influential albums within that sub genre. Nas took flack from hip-hop purists that felt Nas was more Martin Scorsese than Donald Goines. However, it was that style that allowed Nas to paint vivid street tales with a cinematic precision. Firmly establishing Nas as one of the greatest storytellers of his era, Nas continued to improve as an artist on It Was Written with conceptual gems like "I Gave You Power", which was a concept Pac would take a stab at on his Makaveli album, and the lyrical masterpiece "The Message".

     Illmatic is an undeniable classic. But let us not forget how great It Was Written was and is to this day. No album in the 90's, other than Big Pun's Capital Punishment, Jay-Z's Reasonable Doubt and Hard Knock Life, and Biggie's Ready To Die and Life After Death, blended the street sound with the commercial sound better than It Was Written. A solid contribution to the mafioso rap sub genre of hip-hop that included classic collaborations and a reinvigorated Nas with one of the illest, sharpest flows he has ever displayed in his career. It Was Written was important on many levels. It helped pave the way for East Coast dominance in the rap game that would become so prevalent in the mid to late 90's when the West Coast had taken over rap. People forget Nas was one of the few East Coast rappers to see multi-platinum success at the time with the West Coast gripping stranglehold over the minds of hip-hop fans. In addition, a lot of people discovered the brilliance of Illmatic off the strength of It Was Written. It Was Written was so good that it made people go back and listen to Illmatic, an album that otherwise would probably not be as highly recognized and appreciated without the success of It Was Written. It Was Written WAS the album that gave Nas his fanbase and helped to establish Nas as one of the best rappers the game has ever seen. Nas was able to successfully dodge the sophomore jinx. It Was Written has also aged well and I, personally, consider the album to be a classic. These are my thoughts. Thus, it was written......

Jamil Weeks

@Blackheel

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1994: THE GREATEST YEAR IN HIP HOP

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1994: THE GREATEST YEAR IN HIP HOP

Notorious BIG’s Ready to Die, Nas’s Illmatic, Scarface’s The Diary, Outkast’s Southernplayalisticadillacmuizk, Method Man’s Tical and Da Brat’s Funkadfied all have the same thing in common. They were released in the year 1994. Not only were these albums a breath of fresh air to the hip hop scene but they were all trendsetters. What made these albums so unique were that they were the artist debut albums. The marked they have left will forever be remembered.

1994 also introduce the world to possibly one of the greatest hip hop songs ever, I Used to Love Her by Common Sense off of his The Resurrection album. The songs of this year gave the hip hop fans chills. If you thought Common’s I Used to Love Her was a bit soft then just wait for the rugged edge of “NY State of Mind” by a Queenbridge rapper by the name of Nas. Some called him “Rakim the second” but as we all learn later on in his career Nas became his own man and just when that became edgy then we all slowed down to that southern flow of 2 boisterous individuals that would go by Outkast. In the words of Andre 3000, “The South got something to say” and boy did they speak. It was a time when the East Coast was being reintroduce and the South and the Midwest was being introduced. In 1993 the West coast had the hip hop industry in the palms of its hands. Snoop and Dre both released classic albums, The Chronic and Doggystyle and Suge Knights Death Row Records was the best label to be on. Not saying a change was needed but in the words of Sam Cooke, “A Change Is Going To Come.”

What separates the year 1994 from other years in hip hop besides the numerous classic albums but the “slept-on” albums and songs that were made. Albums that are not even mention but lyrically and beat wise it would destroy most of the music that is out right now in 2015. Albums such as Pete Rock and CL Smooth‘s The Main Ingredient, Gang Starr’s Hard To Earn, Lords of The Underground’s Keepers of The Funk and Fugee’s Blunted on Reality would change the way we listen to music now if they had come out in 2015. Album titles had a meaning and weren’t just quotes from a twitter page or something trending on social media but it grab your attention. Not saying today’s album titles are not thought out but the creativity in an album title now a days is a lazy way of just saying your album is coming.

Last but not least 2 of the most important ingredients to a hip hop a song were epic in 1994. Dope Lyrics and great beats. The feeling I as a hip hop fan got when I heard the beat to Gang Starrs “Mass Appeal” or even Ill and Al Scratch “Where My Homies” just don’t give me the same feeling as a French Montana or Meek Mills song.  Most lyrics should stand out and mean something besides shooting guns, slanging crack and calling females “thots”. OC’s 1994 classic “Times Up said it best, “My album will manifest many things that I did or heard about, all told first hand, never word or mouth” . 1994 we need you back. The feeling of hip hop just isn’t the same. The boom bap sound, the lyrics that stood for something and most of all the impact that sound had will never be replace. 1994: The Greatest Year in Hip Hop.

 

-Casey Seawright

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KENDRICK LAMAR: TO PIMP A BUTTERFLY

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KENDRICK LAMAR: TO PIMP A BUTTERFLY

The American Dream

 

Kendrick Lamar is definitely causing some controversy with this one. He made one of his boldest political statements this week when he posted on Instagram the upcoming album cover to, To Pimp a Butterfly.

In the caption he wrote, “Don’t all dogs go to heaven? Don’t Gangsta’s boogie? Do owl sh-t stank? Lions,Tigers & Bears. But TO PIMP A BUTTERFLY. Its the American dream n—a….’ – lil Homie.”

The idea of this concept came from Kendrick Lamar and his manager Dave Free who got French photographer Denis Rouvre to take the photo. The photo is of a few children and a mob of black men holding champagne bottles and stacks of cash on the front lawn of the White House. At the bottom of the photo there is a white judge with his eyes X’d out.

Top Dawg Entertainment (TDE) has said before, If we could link up every gang, and niggas is willing to share the pain, we'd put the White House lights out today.

 The title To Pimp A Butterfly seems to evoke on the title of Harper Lee's novel To Kill A Mockingbird, the 1960 classic about racial prejudice in America. So we kind of get the drift of where Lamar is going with this one. He is known for tackling subjects such as racism, addiction and self- love. We’re just going to have to wait a little longer to see what tracks are equivalent to the book.

 "To Pimp a Butterfly," will feature 16 tracks including the songs "i" and "The Blacker the Berry." Release date on 3/23.

 Drop a comment and let us know what you think about the album cover.

 

@DianaCarolina_05

 

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MC LYTE, HIP HOP'S PIONEER FEMINIST

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MC LYTE, HIP HOP'S PIONEER FEMINIST

Hip hop’ s pioneer feminist, the Brooklyn, New York queen, Mc Lyte was the first female to ever release a hip hop solo album back in 1988,Lyte as a Rock. Her career took off in the late 80s and made it through the early 90s with hits such as, “Cha Cha Cha” and “Paper Thin.”

In 1993 her classic anthem, "Ruffneck," was nominated for a Grammy for Best Rap Single, making MC Lyte the first female solo rapper ever nominated for a Grammy. If you don’t know her you will probably recognize her from featured joints such as Janet Jackson’s, “You Want This” and Brandy’s “I Wanna Be Down.”

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Mc Lyte also did some acting with appearances in shows like,  MTV UnpluggedIn Living ColorMoeshaCousin SkeeterNew York UndercoverMy Wife and Kids and a few others. She went on to do voiceovers and become a DJ as well. She is also the CEO of Sunny Gyrl, INC a production and an entertainment firm. This woman does it all. If you are looking for messages of empowerment than you can read her book, Unstoppable: Igniting the Power Within to Achieve Your Greatest Potential.

 

It’s safe to say she opened doors for other females in the hip-hop culture with her hard hitting lyrics and most importantly because she had the guts to point out the sexism and misogyny that often runs rampant in hip-hop. Salute to MC Lyte and enjoy some of her hits down below.

Diana Hernandez

@DianaCarolina_05



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J.Littles Respect The Grind

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J.Littles Respect The Grind

"Hard work beats talent when talent refuses to work hard, thank the lord i got both," were the final words before the crowd erupted in cheers as an aspiring latino hip-hop artist known as J.Littles took second place at the Coast 2 Coast, Industry Mixer  in NYC.

 

Born in 1984 to a single mother in the city of Medellin,Colombia, J.Littles was exposed to harsh realities at a young age. After a long struggle, his mother was able to achieve her goal and relocate them to a housing tenement in Jersey City, New Jersey  pursuing a better life. The culture and sound of hip-hop was everywhere and J.littles instantly fell in love with the art  after listening to the Lords Of The Underground's hit single Cheif Rocka. It was  then, when he discovered his talent as a wordsmith and developed his own sound, influenced by the legends from the golden era of  HipHop Culture. Understanding the politics and evolution of the music industry he strengthened his movement by studying film at the New York Film Academy in order to be able to direct and edit his own material. His work ethic, consistency and charismatic energy brought his childhood friends together to form Grind City Productions.  Now running as a powerhouse in his local community J.Littles and Grind City Productions have been setting the standard from music to visuals, as well as making a noticeable presence felt on the internet with several of his videos being featured on WSHH and other top 10 websites. Following his Respect The Grind Mixtape series (Vol. 1, 2, & 3) he is finalizing The Respect The Grind short film,  in a 6 part mini series of music videos with clever narration and comical acting skits. Teaming up with professional and digital marketers this project is sure to take his buzz to another level.  Currently working on a debut album his best work is yet to come. Sky's the limit is an understatement, as his journey to stardom is in route.

 

@J.Littles

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Notorious BIG 05/21/1972 - 03/09/1997

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Notorious BIG 05/21/1972 - 03/09/1997

On this day, March 9th, marks the 18th anniversary of one of the greatest emcees in hip-hop history. The Notorious B.I.G. Was fatally shot and killed back in 1997, at the young age of 24, and still, his murder remains a damn mystery. I remember hearing the news that day on Hot97 and watching Telemundo with mom dukes and seeing that foul shit there too. It was crazy, as a shorty, it's hard to comprehend that situations like this really occur in hip-hop and I had trouble accepting it. Everybody in school was buggin, crying, mourning, and although we were kids, many of us already had a great love for hip-hop and Big's passing affected us.

 

Still today, the love for Christopher Wallace is tremendous and his music still lives through his fans. Without a doubt, we're never letting this go. There hasn't been another rapper who's been able to fill Big Poppa's shoes and I'm pretty sure there never will be. With such a short and brief career, his legacy has made a huge impact in hip-hop and even the new cats pay homage. If you don't, you're probably corny and most likely your music is trash.

 

I can't really say that today I'm celebrating anything, however, we at 90shiphopjunkies, acknowledge his passing and respect what he did for the hip-hop culture. Although his catalog wasn't as extensive as many other legendary emcees, it sure doesn't make shit any less significant. What Biggie brought to the game was monumental and will forever be remembered.

 

So tonight, we'd like to share some of our favorite Biggie Smalls records and it would be dope if ya'll can share some of yours with us as well.


Evie Rodriguez

@BonitaAppleBunz 

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1993 ALBUMS REVIEW

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1993 ALBUMS REVIEW

What’s really good family. I hope all my 90sHipHopJunkies out there had a good week. This is the purpburna back again as promised. Now in last weeks review I told you we would be putting 3 classics against each other this week, but after a little debating and some input from the fans out there I decided you can’t put Classics against each other. We’re here to represent them all ‘cause they all had a hand in making us fall in love with that era of HipHop. Myself included. So instead what we’re gonna do this week is take the Top HipHop albums of 1993 and review them for you . Hopefully reading this you’ll become a little nostalgic and go listen to your favorites…

1993

Wu-Tang Clan

Enter the Wutang (36 Chambers)

“Shaolin Shadow boxing and the Wu-Tang sword style. If what you say is true, the Shaolin and the Wu-Tang could be dangerous. Do you think your Wu-Tang sword can defeat me?’

 

“On guard!” “ Ill let you try my Wu-Tang style….”

 

And the rest is history…..

 

They promised to “Bring da Ruckus” and for 22 years that’s exactly what they have been doing. Like many of the albums we will review here on our year to year reviews, every song on this album is a classic. The raw, gritty, hood, gangsta, sewer raps cut through in 1993 and haven’t stopped since. No one else has been able to have 9 distinct personalities in one group and get equal shine. This album paved the way for a lot more classics to come as soon as the next calendar year. As you no longer could just be hardened thugs you also had to be able to hold your own on the Mic… The Rza(the Abbott), the Gza(the Genius), ol’ Dirty Bastard(Baby Jesus), Inspektah Deck(the Rebel INS), Raekwon(the Chef), U-god(Golden Arms), Ghostface Killah(Tony Starks), Masta Killah(the High Chief), and the Method Man(Hot Nickels)… The RZA’s production on this album is what sets the tone. The grittiness of the beats give you that basement studio type of feel. The way the Wu as a whole composes their sentences is like they were speaking a whole different language. It’s hard for the young ones these days to understand it, but we felt it ‘cause we lived it. The RZA’s sampling of Gladys Knight’s “The Way We Were” for the fourth single released “Can It Be So Simple”  was able to bridge two different genres of music. Lyrics by the dynamic duo of Rae and Ghost spoke about the come up. That rags to riches story that all of us growing up in the hood dreamed about. That’s one of the reasons why this album was such a hit, because the hood understood it, we related to it on every level.

 

“Da Mystery of Chessboxin’”, which is my personal favorite on the album, and I’ll tell you why. It’s because we get to hear Masta Killah’s verse which to me is also one of the best on the whole album. Masta Killah and U-God are to two least heard on the album but best believe they make an impact on you when heard… Shout out and Thank you to Masta Killah for that verse. Songs like “Wu-Tang Clan Aint Nuthin’ Ta Fuck Wit”, “C.R.E.A.M.”, and “Protect Ya Neck” set the guidelines for so many of the future hits you would see spawn after 1993. Tracks like “M.E.T.H.O.D. Man”, which was released as the B-side of the “Protect Ya Neck” single are so classic. It’s easily one of the greatest HipHop singles ever. Not only was it an instant hit on the 36 Chambers album, but it was also able to launch Johnny Blaze’s solo career. It was the title track of his first solo album Tical which was released in November of the following year. All in all, when it comes down to production this album Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) is the most important album released in the 90s ‘cause it set the bar for everything else that followed. It gets my vote for one of the best ever and I recommend it for anyone trying to understand why we say we are 90sHipHopJunkies. After hearing this album you will definitely understand why. I’m gonna end this review with the “Can It Be So Simple Intermission” and let the Method Man explain the 9 Members in his own words….


A Tribe Called Quest

Midnight Marauders

“Seven times out of ten we listen to our music at night. Thus spawn the title of this program. The word Marauder means to loot. In this case we maraud for ears.”

-Female Robotic Narrator (Laurel Dann)

Midnight Marauders is the third studio album released by A Tribe Called Quest. ATCQ had already experienced HipHop success with The Low End Theory which was released 2 years prior to Midnight Marauders. The Low End Theory, with its mixture of samples and hard street beats, basically changed HipHop and paved the way for such albums as 36 Chambers and other albums released in ’92-’94, illmatic included. So when they released Midnight Marauders and changed the game all over again it made them greats. Up until now a few artists had tried to incorporate piano sounds into their production, but without much success. Now, when ATCQ lowered the bumpin’ of their drums in their production and added in the Fender Piano sounds, it changed the game all over again. The mixtures of the Fender, plus the lowered drums are ever so present in hit tracks like “Award Tour” and “Electric Relaxation”. Midnight Marauders are one of those albums that you can play from to beginning to end without having to skip a track. The third single released off of the Midnight Marauders was "Oh My God" which featured a sample of former Leaders of the New School MC Busta Rhymes on the chorus. The same sample of Busta Rhymes was also used on the last track of the album "God Lives Through". With this album ATCQ switched their content to not only conscious bars but also to more hood related content. It’s definitely a Classic and once like all the others I review here a must have. Make sure you cop this one for your collection if you don’t already have it because it’s one of the albums that paved the way for our genre.


Snoop Doggy Dogg

Doggystyle

 

Due to his many guest spots on the extremely successful album “The Chronic” by Dr.Dre. Snoop needed absolutely 0 promotion for his own follow up solo album. “Doggystyle” just reiterated and cemented that G-Funk style that the “The Chronic” had previously brought to the game. Calvin Broadus a.k.a Snoop Doggy Dogg is possibly the coolest, smoothest, most charasmatic to ever touch the Mic. His affinity to the Mother Leaf was so strong that Dr.Dre made it the center focus of his critically acclaimed album “The Chronic”. Although “Doggystyle” received massive criticism for it vulgar and extreme lyrics, the album went on to sell over 800,000 copies its first week. That number wasn’t surpassed til 7 years later when Eminem released “The Marshall Mathers LP”. "Who Am I (What's My Name)?" was the first single released from the album. This song basically was an autobiography of who the dogg was. With his fluid, Ganja inspired flow, combined with the harmonizing hook, this song was an instant Classic. "Gin and Juice" was the second single. Again the flows and harmonizing on this track was the epitome of G-Funk not only then but still now. It’s nothing out of the ordinary to see a car coming down the street with “Gin and Juice” blaring out of the speakers. "Lodi Dodi" and "Murder Was the Case" were not official singles, but they both received acclaim from the HipHop heads out there. Snoop was one of the founding fathers who put the West Coast on their backs and made a name for not only himself, but for a whole Coast. I am born and raised in NY/NJ, and I remember growing up and hearing songs off of “Doggystyle” as frequent as I heard East Coast Classics. This here is another must have for the collection. Not only does it portray Gangsta Rap to the fullest, it also shows you how HipHop influenced people just like me on the other side of the country. If you don’t already have this make sure you cop it…

 

 

Thanks again for logging on and supporting the movement. The only way not to let the game die is to teach the young G’s out there so they never forget… Have a blessed week family…

-thePurpburna

 

 

 

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LEGENDS NEVER DIE

Big+L.png

BIG L

Lamont Coleman aka Big L, was arguably one of the best MC’s of all time. Born and raised in the rough and tough streets of Harlem, NY where he started his rap career.  Born May 30, 1974 he was the youngest of three giving him the nickname “Little L”. His love for hip hop started when he was 12 as he started freestyling against everyone in his hood. In the summer of 1990 he met Lord Finesse at an autograph session at a record shop on 125th street where he performed a freestyle where the two exchanged numbers and his journey began.  In one of his last interviews, he stated, “in the beginning, all I ever saw me doing was battling everybody on the street corners, rhyming in the hallways, beating on the wall, rhyming to my friends. Every now and then, a house party, grab the mic, a block party, grab the mic.”

 

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 Big L began writing rhymes in 1990, and created a crew called Children of the Corn (COC). The members were Young Mason “Murder Mase” Betha, Cameron “Killa Cam”, Derek “Bloodshed” Armstead and Herb McGruff releasing 30 songs under the name COC such as “American Dream” and “Harlem Nights”. Big L debuted in D.I.T.C of Diggin’ in the Crates Crew with members Showbiz & A.G. ( Andre the Giant), Diamond D, Lord Finesse, Fat Joe, O.C., and Buckwild making his first cameo performance in 92 on Lord Finesse’s “Yes You May” remix  which was the B-Side to the single “Party Over Here.” In 93 he dropped his first single, “Devil Son”, he later says he wrote the song because “I’ve always been a fan of horror flicks.  Plus the things I see in Harlem are very scary. So I just put it all together in a rhyme.” Some of his first demos from 91 were featured on his debut album, Lifestylez ov da Poor & Dangerous which was released in 95. From this album his second drop was “Clinic.” A radio edit of “Put It On” was released July of 94, three months later the video was released. Then in 95 the video single for “No Endz, No Skinz” debuted. In 96, Big L was dropped from his label, Columbia, due to a dispute between his rapping style and the production from Colombia. Big L stated “I was there with a bunch of strangers that didn’t know my music.” From 97-99 he stated working on The Big Picture which featured cameos from Fat Joe, Kool G Rap, Tupac Shakur, and Big Daddy Kane among others.  This would be his last recorded album released in 2000 put together by his manager and partner in Flamboyant Entertainment, Rich King. 

 

On February 15, 1999; Big L was killed in the doorway of 45 West 139th Street in Harlem being shot 23 times by a drive by shooter. The death is still unsolved. 


With his street savvy and creative word play he set himself apart early in his career on freestyles and will be remembered and recognized as one of the greatest. Today he is considered by many one of the top 10 MC’s of all time. RIP  Lamont “Big L” Coleman.


-90’s Hip-Hop Junkie

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WEEKLY REVIEW 1/7/2015

Hip Hop. It aint a genre to me its life. The first song of the day sets the mood right. Call me the purpburna. Born in 1982 in the boogie I grew up with this shit. First album I ever bought was Aint a Damn Thing Change by Nice & Smooth. Been calling illmatic the Bible before it was cool to do so . I tell you I live this. I’ll be doing a weekly blog reviewing 3 songs a week. We’ll eventually get input from the real hiphopjunkies out there on what to review but this week ill be reviewing new fire by the L.O.X., J.Cole, and Joe Budden.. Hope ya enjoy. S/O to all the 90sHipHopJunkies out there!! Lets keep the movement alive!!

J.Cole- Wet Dreamz

2014 Forest Hills Drive

Starting this off with the young g out the group. This joint will immediately have all my 80s baby back in 1996 passing notes to that first pretty young thing you fell for in class. He goes thru so many emotions we all went thru. Shook as fuck but still gotta play it off like you a vet at this crushin’ shit knowin’ you aint. The kid rides this beat like Kiesha rode X in Belly. It just feels right, the beat gets your head bumpin and the word play is on point as usual. The rest of the album bumps but this is by far my favorite track. Definitely a must have in the V…. Shout out to J. never disappoints.

Joe Budden ft. Emanny- Only Human

Some Love Lost

Joey Jumpoff, Mr. Self-Sabotage, Insanity’s Definition….. Ima warn ya from the jump if your minds unstable this whole album may push you over the edge, but if youre like me and are a firm believer in God never gives us anything we cant handle then all the joints on this album can be used as motivation. This song hits so many different shit us soldiers on the grind go thru. From love to suicide, to depression, drug addiction, and back to love. One thing I love about Joe as an artist is he is an open book. You already know what you getting and this track doesn’t let us down. Coming from my era lyrics are everything and Jumpoff never falls off on that. Emanny lays the ill hook too, his harmonizing will have you singing out loud while bumpin’ this. Joe is very Pac’ like on this one. Theres a part where hes spittin’ about writing a suicide note to his mom that is fucking deep, deep cause I know all my real niggas been there. What can say this track gets my vote….TWICE!!

The L.O.X. ft. Tyler Woods – Horror

The Trinity 2nd Sermon

I saved the best out of the 3 for last. In my opinion at least.. If you don’t almost break your neck when that beat drops then you probably shouldn’t even be on this site. Real talk. This shit is fuckin HARD!! This is a jump a nigga, jack a nigga, rumble type shit. the beat reminds me of some old Don Cartegena and Mobb Deep shit. Boom Bap at its best…the track starts with the resident goon Sheek Looch and man does he rip it. Its like he’s two piecing you thru the wire. Then the Ghost follows up and just raises the level. Droppin knowledge that can resonate with the hood niggas, backpackers, and book worms. These are living legends if you ask me. Never switched it up for no one and this track shows so much growth. All of that sets you up for Mr. Al-Qaeda Jada, Son of Sadam!! Never a throw away line from my nigga Jada. Nigga said “it wasn’t done right if the casket is still open!” OUCH! I grew up with these legends. And theyre still doin their thing. The purpburna and 90sHipHopJunkie SALUTE you for that! DEFINITELY A MUST HAVE!!!!

 

Thanks for reading and log on next week as i take the review to the old school and put 3 classics against each other. If any of ya have an suggestions feel free to follow the kid on Instagram or email me your suggestions… have a blessed week.. 100!!

 

@_purpburna

@90sHipHopJunkie

purpburna@gmail.com

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